Wednesday, 11 September 2019

25 Years Ago This Week: September 11, 1994

From 1987 to 1992, she had dominated the pop music scene, both in Australia and the UK, registering three chart-toppers and 18 top 40 hits locally. So it was a pretty big deal when, after a year off from music in 1993, Kylie Minogue returned this week in 1994.

Kylie Minogue returned with a drastically different sound

But it was not just any comeback - Kylie released the lead single from her first album away from producers Stock Aitken Waterman, who had been responsible for all her hits from "I Should Be So Lucky" onwards. Would her new track return her to the chart highs she'd enjoyed in the past?

ARIA Top 50 Singles and Albums Chart - week ending September 11, 1994

All-4-One enjoyed their final week high up atop the ARIA singles chart this week in 1994 as "I Swear" stayed at number 1 for a fifth week.


Off The Chart
Number 99 "Bop Gun (One Nation)" by Ice Cube featuring George Clinton
Peak: number 93
This third and final top 100 single by the former N.W.A. rapper sampled a Funkadelic track and got its title from a song by Parliament - both groups fronted by George Clinton.

Number 98 "U Go Girl" by Tag Team
Peak: number 85
Following up "Whoomp! (There It Is)" was always going to be tough, but at least the hip-hop duo made the ARIA top 100 with this second single - something they couldn't manage in the US. 

Number 90 "Tree Frog" by Hope
Peak: number 83
As its title suggests, this otherwise fairly unremarkable trance track from David Hope featured the sound of a frog ribbiting throughout. 

Number 79 "Go On Move" by Reel 2 Real featuring The Mad Stuntman
Peak: number 79
Like Tag Team, Reel 2 Real had their work cut out for them living up to "I Like To Move It". Although "Go On Move", which actually pre-dated their big hit, made the UK top 10, Australia didn't come back for much more.


New Entries
Number 50 "My Enemy" by Culture Shock
Peak: number 40
It took its time to get there, but Australian dance group Culture Shock scored a second top 40 hit with this follow-up to "Satisfy The Groove" peaking at number 40 in early October. It would be the final time we'd see them on the chart, with the third single from their self-titled album, "Amor Serenade", missing the top 100. The same fate befell "Who's Gonna Cry For You", a single released by Culture Shock v2.0 in 1995, which by then had become a duo.




Number 49 "Wildflowers" by Things Of Stone And Wood
Peak: number 41
"Happy Birthday Helen" aside, Melbourne folk/rock band Things Of Stone And Wood had a habit of peaking in the 40s and 50s with their singles. Lo and behold, the same thing happened with this lead single from second album Junk Theatre. Despite its cheery sound, "Wildflowers" makes a comment on racism in Australia, asking the question, "Why do Nazis grow like wildflowers?" Why, indeed.




Number 43 "Ain't Nobody" by Jaki Graham
Peak: number 17
It is one of the most covered songs of all time, so it's not that surprising that there were two rival versions of "Ain't Nobody" on the ARIA chart in 1994. Easily the biggest - we'll see the second and less successful one in the coming weeks - was a cover by English singer Jaki Graham. A virtual unknown in Australia, Jaki had enjoyed a trio of top 10 hits in the UK in the mid-'80s, and it's likely this remake was an attempt to get her career back on track after a string of flops there. But while her rendition of the song first released by Rufus and Chaka Khan in 1983 made our top 20, it peaked outside the UK top 40. This new take on "Ain't Nobody" was one of my favourite songs of 1994, but that was down to the Love To Infinity remix, which took a good song and made it even better (as all remixes should).




Number 42 "Dreams" by The Cranberries
Peak: number 30
It had spent a handful of weeks in the lower reaches of the top 100 in late 1993 following the success of "Linger", but "Dreams" - which was actually The Cranberries' debut single - finally became a hit all these months later in the wake of its UK and US success. Although achieving only a relatively modest top 30 placement, the song about first love helped ensure the Irish band's debut album, Everybody Else Is Doing It, So Why Can't We?, which had re-entered the albums top 50 in June, stayed there for a full year.




Number 41 "I Love The Nightlife (Disco 'Round)" by Alicia Bridges
Peak: number 11
It had reached the Australian top 10 in 1979 and, thanks to its use in The Adventures Of Priscilla, Queen Of The Desert, it almost repeated that feat 15 years later. The only hit for American singer Alicia Bridges, "I Love The Nightlife (Disco 'Round)" was given a remix for the occasion by Rapino Bros - the duo who'd also transformed Take That's "Could It Be Magic" and "The Rhythm Of The Night" by Corona, while one of the stars of the internationally successful Australian film about drag queens, Hugo Weaving, appeared in a new music video. 




Number 33 "That's The Thing About Football" by Greg Champion
Peak: number 31
One of those random football songs that found its way into the charts every now and then - especially at this time of year - this tune was one of many written by Greg Champion about his favourite sport. It has grown in stature over the years thanks to its use by Channel 7 in the years since.




Number 31 "Confide In Me" by Kylie Minogue
Peak: number 1
Over five years, Kylie Minogue had perfected the art of the cheery three-minute pop song. Although she sexed up her image with 1990's "Better The Devil You Know" and got a little musically adventurous on her final album for PWL, Let's Get To It, she'd pretty much stayed within familiar territory. After leaving the Stock Aitken Waterman stable, she made a bold move and signed with cool UK dance label Deconstruction, home to the likes of Felix, Usura and M-People. And her first single for her new record company was a huge sonic leap.
For one thing, Kylie didn't start singing on "Confide In Me" until about a minute-and-a-half into the almost-six-minute track. Musically, it sounded like nothing she had ever released before. Written and produced by dance duo Brothers In Rhythm, its orchestral-meets-Middle Eastern feel coupled with its trip-hop beat was nothing short of a revelation. It was the last thing most people would have expected from her, which was why it was exactly the type of song she needed to release at this crucial point in her career. 
Catchy enough to appeal to her pop-loving core fanbase, mature enough to show artistic growth and credible enough to win back those fickle members of the Australian public that had abandoned her throughout her SAW period, "Confide In Me" charged from this entry position straight to number 1, giving Kylie her first chart-topper since 1988's "Got To Be Certain". Way to make a comeback.




Listen to this week's new entries on my Spotify playlist of all the top 50 hits from 1994 (updated weekly):





Next week: it's mega ballad time with two massive downtempo hits - one of which was a cover of a song that had already been to number 1. Plus, the return of Australian rock royalty.


Back to: Sep 4, 1994 <<<<<<<<<<<<<  GO  >>>>>>>>>>>>> Forward to: Sep 18, 1994


1 comment:

  1. One of the pop mags of the time (most likely Smash Hits) asked the question "Will someone please shoot the Mad Stuntman?" The answer (if you want to keep your sanity) is obviously "After you!".

    ReplyDelete